The effects of daylight and daylight saving time on US pedestrian fatalities and motor vehicle occupant fatalities

  • Published: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Volume 36, 2002
  • Authors: D. Coate and S Markowitz
  • Date Added: 18 Mar 2013
  • Last Update: 18 Mar 2013
  • Format: pdf

Objectives:

To analyse the effects of daylight and daylight saving time (DST) on pedestrian and motor vehicle occupant fatalities in the United States.

Methodology:

Multivariate analyses of county level data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System for 2-week periods throughout 1998 and 1999 were used.

Key Findings:

  • Daylight is an important determinant of morning and evening pedestrian fatalities in the US.

  • Results show that full year daylight saving time would reduce pedestrian fatalities by 171 per year, or by 13 per cent of all pedestrian fatalities in the 5.00pm –10.00am and in the 4.00pm –9.00 pm time periods. Motor vehicle occupant fatalities would be reduced by 195 per year, or 3 per cent, during the same time periods.

  • Daylight is a less consistent determinant of motor vehicle occupant fatalities in the morning and evening time periods.

  • However, results for the standard time period indicate that full year daylight saving time would decrease fatalities by 195 per year, or 3 per cent of motor vehicle occupant fatalities during the morning and evening hours. The smaller percentage decrease in motor vehicle occupant deaths relative to pedestrian deaths may be explained by the presence of vehicle lights, which make vehicles visible to other drivers during darkness.

Themes:

Daylight saving, United States, Pedestrian, Fatalities

Comments:

Data from the US but still shows how casualties can be reduced.

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