Zigzag Banner Scheme Information Pack

  • Published: Medway Council, no date
  • Authors: Medway Council
  • Date Added: 18 Apr 2013
  • Last Update: 18 Apr 2013
  • Format: pdf

Objectives: Provide information.

Methodology: Information pack.

Key Findings:

  • The purpose of providing School Keep Clear markings is to keep the space outside of schools free from parked vehicles so that children can be seen more easily when crossing the road.

  • It would seem that the main violators are parent/guardian drivers. Presenting the facts to drivers in the form of incentives, such as the Zig-Zag Banner Scheme, can assist with achieving a reduction in illegal and inconsiderate parking.

  • Medway Council, like most other authorities, has a persistent problem with congestion outside schools at the beginning and end of the school day. A notable problem comes in the form of parking on the keep clear markings. The Safer Routes to School, Parking and Road safety Education teams have jointly developed the zig-zag banners initiative in an attempt to address this particular problem.

  • The green banner is intended to represent a ‘soft approach’, requesting drivers not to park on the zig-zag yellow lines. This should be used during the first three weeks. Driver behaviour should be monitored each day to see if the banner is having an effect. If the green banner is not having the desired effect after the third week, then an amber banner is issued, which carries a slightly stronger message than the green banner.

  • The amber banner is intended to give a ‘stronger message’, requesting drivers not to park on the zig-zag yellow lines. This should be used during the second three weeks. Driver behaviour should be monitored each day to see if the banner is having an effect. If the amber banner is not having the desired effect after the sixth week, then a red banner is issued, which carries a strong message.

  • The red banner is intended to give a ‘very strong message’, requesting drivers not to park on the zig-zag yellow lines. This should be used during the final three weeks. Driver behaviour should be monitored each day to see if the banner is having an effect. If the red banner is not having the desired effect after the final week, then alternative measures should be considered.

  • There are various ways schools can get actively involved in promoting the Zig-Zag Banner Scheme to raise community awareness. For example, a poster competition could be set up where the winning pupil will be rewarded by having their design promoted within the community.

  • The children can also wear items such as high-visibility vests as a means of being seen by drivers on the school journey, as well as having adult supervision when crossing the road outside the school gates.

  • Distributing leaflets and hand outs are other ways to remind parents of the inherent danger in stopping on the ‘school keep clear’ markings and the possibility of penalty charges once signing is in place.

  • Promoting school events such as parent evenings, open days and social events are also ideal opportunities for raising awareness. This could be in the form of an assembly, presentation or even a re-enactment of a road scene put on by the teachers and children in order to prove the point.

  • Another idea could be for the children to conduct surveys and then present findings in the school newsletters, entrance boards, and school intranet and group presentations.

  • If the Zig-Zag Banner Scheme does not produce the desired results, there are a number of alternative schemes, such as the ones listed below:

    • Naming and Shaming involves putting the colour of the offending car and part of its number plate into the school newsletter. This means that the driver is aware of their wrong-doing. A school in Medway adopted this policy which proved successful.

    • Offering a park and stride or a car-sharing scheme may also prove successful in reducing congestion at the school gates. Here parents would park their cars a given distance away from the school and walk their children the remainder of the way.

    • Providing alternative parking away from the school can be an opportunity for schools to liaise with other surrounding businesses and use this as a means of promoting the whole issue (turning a negative issue into a positive solution).

    • Schemes such as the Walking Bus and Green Footsteps Challenge continue to prove very successful in Medway, as the benefits to all parties involved are vast. This charity-run project operates in Medway on a partnership basis known as the Kent and Medway Walking Bus Group.

Themes:

Zig-zag yellow lines, Illegal parking

Comments:

Provides useful information about possible interventions but do not highlight whether these interventions are effective.

Free